Monday 22 January 2018 | 19

One Voice fight for dogs in Congo

Cases of rabies and parasitosis have been reported around the Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The animals in the area are in dire need of our help. Time is running out: the slaughter of animals is all too often the only way out for the authorities.

Hr blog

The socio-economic situation of local communities and the equilibrium of ecosystems have been the collateral but are very real victims for decades of armed conflicts. Since 2000, we have worked with Bantu for the animals on the spot. During the intensification of the armed conflict, he had to resort to taking refuge in Uganda. We helped him bring his wife and children to him and they survived. He is a very committed man of exemplary courage, with whom we have forged strong relationships, mutual aid and combat. He is both our anchor and our relay there.

Humans around the Virunga National Park survive only through hunting, accompanied by sick and contagious dogs. In such circumstances, health considerations are secondary and all pay a heavy price for this ignorance. One Voice, in partnership with Bantu, is working together to help humans and animals alleviate this health problem that is adding to the pre-existing political and humanitarian crisis.

One of the consequences of these extreme situations for the populations, is that the dogs participating in these hunts are sometimes wounded, or contract various parasitosis (verminousness and dermatoses), following tick bites. At least three out of four dogs are carriers, and suffer terribly from these untreated conditions. Populations, unaware of the resulting health consequences, often abandon or simply let wounded or sick dogs wander, which encourages their contagion and spread to vulnerable people with whom they come into contact with, but also to other domesticated animals and wild animals nearby. In particular, cases of rabies have been reported, which means an assured death for all affected people.

One Voice financially supports the anti-rabies vaccination campaign in the area around Bantu Virunga Park in Congo (which also sterilizes and castrates stray animals), and has participated in the purchase of many veterinary products to combat ticks and sores on pets. It is urgent to act very quickly, to avoid that the authorities decide, as too often in the world, to slaughter animals instead of treating them!

Hr blog

In the subject

The Reunion, urgent ... Stop the problem of stray animals
No to the slaughter of stray dogs in Frontenaud!

Comments 19

I accept that publication of my comments is subject to the code of conduct.

seve | Thursday 01 February 2018

Je me suis toujours demandée ce qu'il en était des chiens sur le continent africain, j'ai ma réponse:même là bas, il y a des anges gardiens pour eux, pour les protéger, soulager leur souffrance, les considérer à leur juste valeur, les soigner...MERCI POUR EUX!!!Et chapeau bas pour votre dévouement sans frontières!!!!!!!!!!!!
Séverine

mumu | Thursday 01 February 2018

respect et encouragements à one voice et aux acteurs de terrain ! le pire prédateur c'est l'homme, imbu d'une soit-disant supériorité qui n'existe pas en fait.

Danièle | Thursday 01 February 2018

Que ce soit le Congo, la Russie ou la Roumanie (et tant d'autres pays), les animaux sont souvent abandonnés à leur triste sort voire euthanasiés (comme en Russie actuellement). D'autres sont volontairement torturés ou utilisés pour des expérimentations animales (le scandale VW est intolérable). Mon coeur saigne à chaque fois en lisant ces atrocités. L'homme est un prédateur pire que l'animal, qui lui tue pour se nourrir. Je remercie donc One Voice du boulot effectué et de leur dévouement. Danièle

Chantou | Thursday 01 February 2018

Merci pour vos interventions .